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Growing number of women ignoring potentially life-threatening symptoms


Growing number of women ignoring potentially life-threatening symptoms

Growing number of women ignoring potentially life-threatening symptoms

(original artcle from Netdoctor)

Ovarian Cancer Action fears too many mothers are putting work and family before their own health

Juggling a family, a career and (perhaps) a social life means all but the most important things tend to get sidelined for many mothers. But according to new research, a growing number of women are failing to go the doctor with potentially life-threatening symptoms because they feel too busy with work or family commitments.

According to research by Ovarian Cancer Action, more than a quarter of women said they prioritised work over making an appointment with their doctor and more than a third said that looking after their family came before anything else.

A further 14% said that spending time with their partner was more important than seeking medical help. Many women also said they found it difficult to speak to a doctor because they find it embarrassing, feel judged or that they're not being taken seriously. Katherine Taylor, Chief Executive of Ovarian Cancer Action said:

"The reluctance for women to seek help and speak up about health issues is really worrying but it's not hard to understand. From being too busy or feeling too shy, to prioritising the needs of our families or our jobs - every woman is different and there are myriad reasons that health issues may not take precedence in the busy lives we lead. However, in diseases like ovarian cancer - in which symptoms can be vague and diagnosis is tricky - we, as women, need to listen to our bodies, keep a close eye on our health and be persistent with doctors if we think something is wrong."